Radiology Board Review(RBR)

Hints and Tips, Traps and Pitfalls

  • Face A Case

    RadPod's Channel
  • Imaging Gallery

    DRANZCR3 XRDiag 081118.068-001

    DRANZCR3 XRDiag 081118.067-001

    DRANZCR3 XRDiag 081118.064-001

    DRANZCR3 XRDiag 081118.065-001

    More Photos
  • RSS Unknown Feed

    • An error has occurred; the feed is probably down. Try again later.
  • RSS Unknown Feed

    • An error has occurred; the feed is probably down. Try again later.
  • RSS Unknown Feed

    • An error has occurred; the feed is probably down. Try again later.
  • RSS Unknown Feed

    • An error has occurred; the feed is probably down. Try again later.
  • RSS Unknown Feed

    • An error has occurred; the feed is probably down. Try again later.
  • RSS Unknown Feed

    • An error has occurred; the feed is probably down. Try again later.

Essentials of Radiology

Posted by oralboards on August 7, 2009

  1. Learning Radiology ” by William Herring, MD, FACR
  2. Essentials of Neuroradiology
  3. Essentials of Musculoskeletal Imaging
  4. Essentials of Chest Radiology
  5. Essentials of Nuclear Medicine
  6. Essentials of Breast Imaging
  7. Essentials of Sonograpgy
  8. Essentials of Pediatric Radiology
  9. Essentials of body Imaging
  10. Radiology Assistant
  11. Interactive Tutorials
  12. Radiology Classics
  13. Radiology Learning Lab
  14. Radiology Tutorials from University of Virigina
  15. Dr. Feigin’s Systematic Chest Lecture (PDF, 20.6 MB) – Systematic approach to chest radiographs and CTs
  16. Dr. Feigin’s chest curriculum
  17. Dr. Feigin’s Cardiovascular Imaging Lecture
  18. HRCT part I : Basic Interpretation
  19. BI-RADS
  20. Breast – MRI
  21. Abdominal Trauma – Role of CT
  22. Acute Abdomen – A Practical Approach
  23. Adrenals: differentiation of adrenal masses
  24. Radiology Reporting Templates

Posted in Radiology Basics | Comments Off

High Yield

Posted by oralboards on July 31, 2009

  1. Pulmonary Segments 
  2. Evaluating Pulmonary Nodules
  3. HRCT
  4. Intracranial Circulation
  5. MRI Appearance of Blood
  6. Organ Injury Grading
  7. Thyroid Nodules guidelines 
  8. Renal Cyst Classification (Bosniak)
  9. Pediatric Chest Differentials
  10. Chest Patterns 
  11. VQ Analysis 
  12. Endoleaks types 
  13. Neuroradiology DDx
  14. Liver Lesions on MRI 
  15. Adrenal adenoma Characterization 
  16. MSK Measurements
  17. Intro to Cardiac MRI
  18. Patterns of Myelination on MRI
  19. Classification for Tibial Plateau Fractures
  20. Cobb method for measurement of scoliosis
  21. Characteristic MRI signal and enhancement pattern of liver lesions

High Yield : SECTION REVIEW

  1. Angiography
  2. Cardiac
  3. Chest
  4. Gastrointestinal
  5. Genitourinary
  6. Mammography
  7. Musculoskeletal
  8. Neuroradiology
  9. Nuclear Medicine
  10. Pediatrics
  11. Ultrasound

Posted in Things you always need in your pantry | Comments Off

Must Have Radiology Books

Posted by oralboards on July 21, 2009

 

  • Fundamentals of Body Ct (3rd Edition)
  • Fundamentals of Pediatric Radiology
  • Chest Radiology: The Essentials
  • Radiology Requisites 
  • Imaging: Case Review Series
  • IRAD: Interactive Radiology Review & Assessment  
  • Pocket Radiologist
  • Diagnostic Imaging Series 
  • Musculoskeletal MRI by Clyde A. Helms MD 
  • Imaging Companion Series 
  • Mayo Clinic Gastrointestinal Imaging Review  
  • Essentials of Nuclear Medicine Imaging (Mettler) 
  • Primer of Diagnostic Imaging 
  • Aunt Minnie’s Atlas and Imaging-Specific Diagnosis  
  • Duke Radiology Case Review 
  • Interventional Radiology Essentials
  • Fundamentals of Skeletal Radiology
  • Review of Radiological Physics by Huda  
  • Radiologic Physics Review  by Nickoloff
  •  

    ABR Statistics

      The American Board of Radiology maintains statistics (stats)for pass rates for the written, physics, and oral portions of the radiology board examination on the American Board of Radiology (ABR) website at:  http://theabr.org/ Realize that the radiology oral board pass rate only includes those who passed unconditionally.  Those who condition the radiology oral board examination are not included in the published pass rate.  The condition rate is generally high, making the fail rate quite low for first time test takers. ABR Dates

    Radiology Oral Board – First Time Exam Takers

      The vast majority of first time examinees pass the radiology oral board examination.  Between 75% and 82% of first time test takers pass the American Board of Radiology (ABR) exam in any given year.  Most people who do not pass outright condition the radiology oral board examination. 15%-19% of examinees condition the radiology oral board.  A majority of people who condition the radiology board exam will pass the test when they repeat the conditioned subjects.  Only 2%-7% of first time test takers fail the radiology oral board examination.  Remember that this number includes people who did not even take the test because of a medical emergency, missed airline flight, family emergency, death, etc.  The fact is a very small number of people fail the test. Yet the vast majority of people are petrified about failing the oral board exam.  The fear leads to anxiety which is the primary reason people do poorly at the oral board exam.                       

     

     

    Repeat Test Takers

      The statistics are not as good for repeat radiology oral board exam takers.  However, between 54% and 69% of repeat oral board test takers will fall into the combined pass or condition category.  The failure rate for repeat test takers is between 30 and 46%.  Why the difference?  First, these people have already failed the radiology oral board exam once.  Their anxiety level has increased substantially (Especially if anxiety caused their first failure).  Second, they are likely in practice now rather than training.  Their opportunity to study has on average decreased.  In addition, they have probably had poor guidance on how to prepare for the oral board examination since they failed the first time.  Since no one has taught them to deal with the anxiety, their chance of success is decreased.  I believe the statistical difference would be eliminated if the repeaters learned to manage their anxiety and prepare for the test properly. 

    Stress and Anxiety

    Posted in You Can Do it! by oralboards on July 18, 2009

    Stress and Anxiety

      You might think that the main reason that people fail the board examination is due to lack of sufficient study or case presentation.  My experience is that most people spend enough time preparing these skills.  In fact, most residents are extremely well prepared in these areas.  The reason is that all tests to this point have been written tests, and examinees are very familiar with studying for a written type of test.  The same study skills can be used to prepare for the oral board examination.  What the majority of examinees fail to recognize is that stress and anxiety are much larger factors in an oral examination.  Few candidates spend any time preparing to deal with anxiety and stress.  I am not aware of any training programs or review courses that successfully address these issues.  The fact is that most people who do not pass the board examination did not test well due to anxiety and stress.  I strongly advise my students to prepare for the anxiety and stress that the examination will provoke.  For each individual, the preparation may be different.  If you do take the time to prepare yourself mentally for the challenge, your chance of success will be greatly enhanced.  Sitting in the “hot seat” while presenting cases is a good tool for preparing for examination stress and anxiety.  However, I would suggest spending some time with books, tapes, or video’s about the subject of stress and anxiety management.  The small amount of time you spend on this task may slightly decrease the amount of study time for radiology, but you will be handsomely rewarded!

    Resources to Reduce Exam, Test, and Oral Board Stress and Anxiety

      Radiology Exam Anxiety and Stress Reduction Resources”Hot Seat” preparation for many people desensitizes the anxiety and stress response so that they can perform well in the radiology oral board exam.  However, some people tend to be more anxious or nervous despite this type of preparation.  Numerous resources are available to assist you with test and exam anxiety and stress reduction.  If you feel like you need additional help beyond the standard “hot seat” preparation, the following links show various anxiety and stress reduction books and audio books that may help you: 
    The small amount of time you spend preparing for anxiety and stress management and reduction will pay big dividends on test day.  What about anxiety reducing medication?I have been asked by quite a few residents about taking beta blockers or benzodiazepines for the examination.  I do not recommend taking any medication prior to the examination, particularly if you do not know how it will affect your mental acuity.  Remember that some anxiety and stress is essential for your mental alertness and performance on the test.  You don’t want to be mentally sluggish or asleep!  Your goal is to harness the anxiety for constructive purposes rather than being paralyzed with fear.  With that being said, I realize that you are all doctors and capable of making your own decisions about medication.What about Coffee or Caffeine?If you are accustomed to having coffee or caffeine, I would still have some before the exam.  You don’t wan to be distracted by withdrawal symptoms during the test.  Remember, however, that caffeine may increase your anxiety levels though so moderation is prudent.              

    Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a Comment »

    Radiology Physics

    Posted by oralboards on July 21, 2009

    1. Compilation of Radiology Physics Practice Exams ( RAPHEX

    2. University of Washington School of Medicine Rad Physics online

    3. RAPHEX 2002 Questions 

    4. UCSD Physics Recalls

    5. Online Diagnostic Radiology Practice ExamsCompilation of Radiological Physics Examination (RAPHEX)

    6. Course in Diagnostic Radiology Physics: Radiation Risks in Diagnostic Radiology (2008) 

    7. RSP 1308 – CT Imaging – Dose Assessment in Clinical Practice (2009) 

    8. Update Course in Diagnostic Radiology Physics: Screen-Film and Digital Mammography (2008)

    9. Doppler US Techniques: Concepts of Blood Flow Detection and Flow Dynamics

    10. B-mode US: Basic Concepts and New Technology

    11. Radiation Dose in CT

    12. Image Processing in CT

    13. Search for Isotropic Resolution in CT from Conventional through Multiple-Row Detector

    14. Fluoroscopy: Patient Radiation Exposure Issues

    15. Digital Fluoroscopy

    16. Fluoroscopy: Recording of Fluoroscopic Images and Automatic Exposure Control

    17. Fluoroscopy: Optical Coupling and the Video System

    18. X-ray Image Intensifiers for Fluoroscopy

    19. General Overview of Fluoroscopic Imaging

    20. Digital Mammography: An Overview

    21. Technological and Psychophysical Considerations for Digital Mammographic Displays

    22. Fundamental Physics of MR Imaging

    23. MR Artifacts, Safety, and Quality Control

    24. MR Imaging: Brief Overview and Emerging Applications

    25. Technologic Advances in Multidetector CT with a Focus on Cardiac Imaging

    26. Physics of Cardiac Imaging with Multiple-Row Detector CT

    MRI Text Online(Joseph P. Hornak, Ph.D.)
    1. Introduction
    2. The Mathematics of NMR
    3. Spin Physics
    4. NMR Spectroscopy
    5. Fourier Transforms
    6. Imaging Principles
    7. Fourier Transform Imaging Principles
    8. Basic Imaging Techniques
    9. Imaging Hardware
    10. Image Presentation
    11. Image Artifacts
    12. Advanced Imaging Techniques
    13. Your MRI Exam
    14. Clinical Images
     
    I. Image Quality (or Clarity)
    II. Unsharpness, Resolution
    A. resolving power
    B. point-spread function
    C. line-spread function
    D. edge-response function
    E. modulation transfer function Physical Characteristics of Nuclear Medicine Images
    F. factors degrading spatial resolution
    III. Contrast
    A. subject contrast
    B. displayed contrast
    C. dynamic range (latitude)
    D. factors degrading contrast
    IV. Noise
    V. Artifacts (Attenuation)
    VI. Conclusions
    Isotopes and Radioactivity

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Posted in Radiology Physics Review | Leave a Comment »

    Must Have Radiology Review Books

    Posted by oralboards on July 18, 2009

    1. Fundamentals of Body Ct (3rd Edition)
    2. Fundamentals of Pediatric Radiology
    3. Chest Radiology: The Essentials
    4. Radiology Requisites 
    5. Imaging: Case Review Series
    6. IRAD: Interactive Radiology Review & Assessment  
    7. Pocket Radiologist
    8. Diagnostic Imaging Series 
    9. Musculoskeletal MRI by Clyde A. Helms MD 
    10. Imaging Companion Series 
    11. Mayo Clinic Gastrointestinal Imaging Review  
    12. Essentials of Nuclear Medicine Imaging (Mettler) 
    13. Primer of Diagnostic Imaging 
    14. Aunt Minnie’s Atlas and Imaging-Specific Diagnosis  
    15. Duke Radiology Case Review 
    16. Interventional Radiology Essentials
    17. Fundamentals of Skeletal Radiology
    18. Review of Radiological Physics by Huda  
    19. Radiologic Physics Review  by Nickoloff

    Posted in Radiology Book Store | Leave a Comment »

    Yes You Can! By Thomas Wiley, MD

    Posted by oralboards on July 18, 2009

    Are you stressed out about the Board of Radiology oral board exam? Are you buried under a sea of radiology textbooks with no idea where to start your studies? Are you tired of calling your friends for answers, only to be left with more questions? You tried radiology review courses, radiology teaching files and radiology review textbooks, but you were dismayed and overwhelmed by the endless amount of radiology information and material. You are not alone. Find the right tools here to pass the american board of radiology diagnostic radiology oral board examination in Louisville with less stress!The typical radiology resident goals for the radiology oral board exam include knowing everything about every subject in radiology, getting every question right on the american board of radiology oral examination, and passing the oral board without any stress or anxiety.  Most residents believe that any subject in radiology is possible on the examination, and that possible examination scenarios cannot be predicted.  Therefore, all radiology subjects must be studied thoroughly.  No time is devoted to stress and anxiety management.  Instead, the resident devotes as much time as possible to studying radiology images and x-rays.  The goal of knowing everything in radiology is noble, but ultimately impossible for most.  Fortunately, the vast majority of residents will learn enough to pass anyway.  

     

    5 Keys to Success to Radiology Oral Board Exam Success

      1. Learn to manage anxiety.  Anxiety is very high at the radiology oral board examination.  Those who learn to manage their anxiety will excel, while those who do not will stumble 2. Be Average.  Since the vast majority of board exam applicants pass, you are better off striving to be average.  The average candidate passes.  At the end of the day, you have a better chance of passing if the examiner remembers little about you.  In my opinion, the more you differ from the norm in appearance, style, or personality, the greater chance that you may fall to one side of the bell curve. 3. Learn to Follow the Hints of the Board Examiner.  Examiners only lead the candidate to a conclusion for two reasons.  Usually they are trying to help you come to the correct conclusion.  Occasionally they may be trying to see if you will choose to do something dangerous to the patient.  When the examiner is leading you, ask yourself if following the lead would be dangerous to the patient.  If not, follow the lead!  If it would be dangerous, express your concern over patient safety.  Do not argue with the examiner.  Just state your safety concerns.4. Develop a Methodical Approach to Radiologic Image Evaluation.  Those who do not develop a systematic approach to image interpretation will panic when the abnormality is not quickly apparent.  The resultant anxiety could be difficult to overcome.  In addition, sometimes more than one abnormality is present on the image.  If you only talk about the first abnormality (satisfaction of search) you may not open your eyes to the other clues available.  I like to use the geographic approach from outer to inner.  Some people prefer an organ based approach.  Use whatever works for you, but make sure that you make this a routine habit.  You will not be able to do it at the oral board exam in a panic if you have not developed this as a subconscious habit.5. Develop a Methodical Approach to Differential Diagnosis (Interpretation).  Similarly, if the answer is not readily apparent, many oral board candidates will panic.  Successful candidates use a methodical approach to find categories of disease which could result in the findings.  The systematic approach will reduce anxiety and panic.  This approach only works if it is well practiced and routine.  I personally like the CITMAN mnemonic.  It is short and simple.  Moreover, it covers most of the types of disease processes you will see. 

     

    • C-congenital
    • I-infection, inflammation
    • T-trauma
    • M-metabolic
    • A-allergic, autoimmune (remember to add vascular to this one)
    • N-neoplasm.

    More comprehensive differential diagnosis approaches exist, but I believe simple is better.

    Posted in You Can Do it! | Comments Off

    Radiology Oral Board

    Posted by oralboards on July 18, 2009

    Exact ABR Statistics

      The American Board of Radiology maintains statistics (stats)for pass rates for the written, physics, and oral portions of the radiology board examination on the American Board of Radiology (ABR) website at:  http://theabr.org/ Realize that the radiology oral board pass rate only includes those who passed unconditionally.  Those who condition the radiology oral board examination are not included in the published pass rate.  The condition rate is generally high, making the fail rate quite low for first time test takers. ABR Dates

    Radiology Oral Board – First Time Exam Takers

      The vast majority of first time examinees pass the radiology oral board examination.  Between 75% and 82% of first time test takers pass the American Board of Radiology (ABR) exam in any given year.  Most people who do not pass outright condition the radiology oral board examination. 15%-19% of examinees condition the radiology oral board.  A majority of people who condition the radiology board exam will pass the test when they repeat the conditioned subjects.  Only 2%-7% of first time test takers fail the radiology oral board examination.  Remember that this number includes people who did not even take the test because of a medical emergency, missed airline flight, family emergency, death, etc.  The fact is a very small number of people fail the test. Yet the vast majority of people are petrified about failing the oral board exam.  The fear leads to anxiety which is the primary reason people do poorly at the oral board exam.                  

     

    Repeat Test Takers

      The statistics are not as good for repeat radiology oral board exam takers.  However, between 54% and 69% of repeat oral board test takers will fall into the combined pass or condition category.  The failure rate for repeat test takers is between 30 and 46%.  Why the difference?  First, these people have already failed the radiology oral board exam once.  Their anxiety level has increased substantially (Especially if anxiety caused their first failure).  Second, they are likely in practice now rather than training.  Their opportunity to study has on average decreased.  In addition, they have probably had poor guidance on how to prepare for the oral board examination since they failed the first time.  Since no one has taught them to deal with the anxiety, their chance of success is decreased.  I believe the statistical difference would be eliminated if the repeaters learned to manage their anxiety and prepare for the test properly. 

    Posted in You Can Do it! | Leave a Comment »

    Stress and Anxiety

    Posted by oralboards on July 18, 2009

    Stress and Anxiety

      You might think that the main reason that people fail the board examination is due to lack of sufficient study or case presentation.  My experience is that most people spend enough time preparing these skills.  In fact, most residents are extremely well prepared in these areas.  The reason is that all tests to this point have been written tests, and examinees are very familiar with studying for a written type of test.  The same study skills can be used to prepare for the oral board examination.  What the majority of examinees fail to recognize is that stress and anxiety are much larger factors in an oral examination.  Few candidates spend any time preparing to deal with anxiety and stress.  I am not aware of any training programs or review courses that successfully address these issues.  The fact is that most people who do not pass the board examination did not test well due to anxiety and stress.  I strongly advise my students to prepare for the anxiety and stress that the examination will provoke.  For each individual, the preparation may be different.  If you do take the time to prepare yourself mentally for the challenge, your chance of success will be greatly enhanced.  Sitting in the “hot seat” while presenting cases is a good tool for preparing for examination stress and anxiety.  However, I would suggest spending some time with books, tapes, or video’s about the subject of stress and anxiety management.  The small amount of time you spend on this task may slightly decrease the amount of study time for radiology, but you will be handsomely rewarded!

    Resources to Reduce Exam, Test, and Oral Board Stress and Anxiety

      Radiology Exam Anxiety and Stress Reduction Resources”Hot Seat” preparation for many people desensitizes the anxiety and stress response so that they can perform well in the radiology oral board exam.  However, some people tend to be more anxious or nervous despite this type of preparation.  Numerous resources are available to assist you with test and exam anxiety and stress reduction.  If you feel like you need additional help beyond the standard “hot seat” preparation, the following links show various anxiety and stress reduction books and audio books that may help you: 
    The small amount of time you spend preparing for anxiety and stress management and reduction will pay big dividends on test day.  What about anxiety reducing medication?I have been asked by quite a few residents about taking beta blockers or benzodiazepines for the examination.  I do not recommend taking any medication prior to the examination, particularly if you do not know how it will affect your mental acuity.  Remember that some anxiety and stress is essential for your mental alertness and performance on the test.  You don’t want to be mentally sluggish or asleep!  Your goal is to harness the anxiety for constructive purposes rather than being paralyzed with fear.  With that being said, I realize that you are all doctors and capable of making your own decisions about medication.What about Coffee or Caffeine?If you are accustomed to having coffee or caffeine, I would still have some before the exam.  You don’t wan to be distracted by withdrawal symptoms during the test.  Remember, however, that caffeine may increase your anxiety levels though so moderation is prudent.              

     

    Posted in You Can Do it! | Leave a Comment »

    Radiology Physics Review Courses and Practice Exams

    Posted by oralboards on July 18, 2009

    Radiology Physics Exam Review

    The written radiology physics exam must be passed prior to taking the radiology oral board examination.

    Posted in Radiology Physics Review | Leave a Comment »

    Radiology Oral Board Exam Review Courses

    Posted by oralboards on July 18, 2009

  • The Duke Review
  • The San Diego Review Course
  • The UCSF Radiology Review
  • Gainesville Hot Seats
  • New York Roentgen Society Radiology Review Course
  • University of Chicago Radiology Review Course
  • The Osler Institute Radiology Oral Board Review
  • Posted in Radiology Review Courses | Comments Off

     
    Follow

    Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

    Join 43 other followers